Author Topic: (PSX) FF7 Music Sequence Data  (Read 3132 times)

JamieT

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(PSX) FF7 Music Sequence Data
« on: 2012-06-13 13:47:48 »
Hello,

Here is my "problem"...

I'd like to be able to "view" the sequence data in the PSX music files in a piano-roll, so that I can see the exact notes for each individual instrument, much like a MIDI editor.

From what I understand, the MIDIs that are included in the PC version, don't have all the original instrument tracks/channels, because the midis are limited to 16 channels, but the PSX can have up to 32 instrument channels. So for me, the psx has the true, original music data.

I've had experience with ripping the SEQ data from PSF's and miniPSF's from the Crash Bandicoot series, and converting the SEQs to MIDI files. I have then ripped the instrument samples, and used all this to rebuild some songs in Fruity Loops. The tools I used were, VGMToolbox for SEQs, and PSound to rip the instrument samples.

So far, I have ripped the instrument samples from Neil Corlett's FF7 miniPSF files, but I've had no luck extracting the actual sequence data from the minipsfs. I understand that FF7 uses AKAO frames instead of SEQ, so that is why I've had no luck, I guess!

From what I understand about miniPSFs, is that the instrument samples are in the PSF-Lib, and the sequence data is in the .minipsf file. I am assuming, that the sequence data is standard for all types of psf, regardless whether they are AKAO or SEQ format. Maybe this is a wrong assumption?

What I do know, is that my computer can play PSF files, and plays the correct notes for each instrument. What I would like, as stated above, is to actually see HOW the instruments are played, like you can with midi files.
The main reason for this is to be able to re-build FF7 songs as accurately as possible in music sequencers.

To be totally specific, Little Big Planet 2 is my true motive.
The music sequencer in this game isn't amazing, but there is alot you can do with how the instruments sound. I have tried using the MIDI files to rebuild the songs, but there are certain songs, where the midi sound fonts / samples, sound nothing like the originals, and it's sometimes difficult to hear certain instrument tracks, and how they would sound when played solo. If I had access to hear each invidual instrument track from the psx originals, or the psf files, then I could create some pretty authentic sounding songs.

I know that my application of the data is something that not many people are interested in, or care about, but I would really like to know if this can be done, or if anyone else has tried, or is interested in this idea?

Vehek

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Re: (PSX) FF7 Music Sequence Data
« Reply #1 on: 2012-06-16 22:49:27 »
From what I understand, the MIDIs that are included in the PC version, don't have all the original instrument tracks/channels, because the midis are limited to 16 channels, but the PSX can have up to 32 instrument channels. So for me, the psx has the true, original music data.
I don't know if that's true about the channel count. I haven't checked every song yet, but according to a Japanese page about the AKAO format, the only songs in FF7 with more than 16 channels are "World Crisis" and "Staff Roll".

From what I understand about miniPSFs, is that the instrument samples are in the PSF-Lib, and the sequence data is in the .minipsf file. I am assuming, that the sequence data is standard for all types of psf, regardless whether they are AKAO or SEQ format. Maybe this is a wrong assumption?
They're not all the same, because as I understand, different games use different programs to playback custom sequence formats.

Not sure if there's anything for displaying note data. In terms of information about AKAO, there's the wiki page, the AKAO player in the Q-Gears sources, and that Japanese page I mentioned earlier. I'm not sure whether to link that last one because supposedly (according to halkun several years ago), game modification is even more illegal over in Japan. Then again, I think I've seen plenty to contradict the idea that the Japanese are mostly against dissecting and modifying games.